Guides & Advice

Helping employees keep their cool in a heatwave

Published: 19th July 2021
Area: Employment

 

This recent heatwave has brought up questions surrounding dress code and hot weather policies, particularly for those employees who are working remotely.

The fact that many employees are still working from home does not mean that employers can suddenly forget their health and safety responsibilities. Plus, if people are uncomfortable it’s difficult to maintain a productive workplace.

So should re-assessments be made? Here we explore what businesses can do to ensure their employees stay cool, wherever they’re working.

  1. Safe working temperatures

Employers usually rely on air conditioning and ventilation to regulate temperatures within the workplace.  However, with many employees still working at home they may not have this option, with their only means of keeping cool to open windows. This could lead to the potential disturbance from street noise and neighbours when trying to make telephone or video calls, and therefore can make this option impractical.

Businesses should think about what else they can do to be of practical assistance, for example, by providing workers with electric fans if appropriate.

For those employees that have returned to the workplace, although there is a minimum working temperature of 16 degrees centigrade, currently there is no maximum temperature. This is because in some work environments, such as a bakery or foundry, the temperature will reach higher temperatures far quicker than in an office. Therefore, it’s difficult to set an appropriate limit for all.

  1. Legal obligations

Employers have no legal obligation to ensure suitable working temperatures. However, they do have a duty of care over their employees, so must provide a safe environment where staff are not at risk of falling ill from the heat.

With regards to the usual workplace, installing air conditioning or making sure there is always access to cold water, could form part of this.

To protect workforce wellbeing when remote working is in place, employers should follow a sensible plan; this should involve line managers checking in with staff at least once a day and reminding employees to stay hydrated and take proper breaks.

  1. Dress code

For those employees that have returned to the workplace, in hot weather, businesses should consider relaxing the rules around restrictive clothing, such as ties. Employees are unlikely to produce their best work when all they can think about is how warm they are.

It may even be worth introducing a dress-down policy for days when temperatures are considerably above average, and for meeting commitments encourgae a more casual dress code.

Employers with a dress code in place for video calls when working remotely should also consider relaxing it.

  1. Flexible working

On days of extreme temperatures, implementing an early start and late finish workday, like those common in hot countries, would allow workers to rest during the worst of the heat and work when it is cooler.

Your employees’ health and safety should always be a priority.

Failing to consider what adjustments could be made to support employees when the temperature rises is not advisable. If staff become ill from the heat, especially those with health conditions which mean they are more susceptible, employers could find themselves involved in a personal injury dispute.

Ultimately, employee safety should always be an employer’s top priority and they cannot force staff to work if temperature and noise levels prohibit them from doing so.

Certain disabilities, such as COPD and arthritis, also make working in high temperatures particularly difficult, so employers need to consider reasonable adjustments that may need to be made to help them do their jobs safely.

Contact us

If you have any queries or would like some advice with ensuring your employees are kept safe during a heatwave, our team of employment lawyers can help – speak to a member of your local employment team.

Our employment team is ranked as a Leading Firm in the Legal 500 2021 edition. 

From inspirational SHMA Talks to informative webinars, we also have lots of educational and entertaining content for life and business. Visit SHMA® ON DEMAND.

Our free legal helpline offers bespoke guidance on a range of subjects, from employment and general business matters through to director’s responsibilities, insolvency, restructuring, funding and disputes. We also have a team of experts on hand for any queries on family and private matters too. Available from 10am-12pm Monday to Friday, call 0800 689 4064.

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